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CT Government Weekly Rundown—October 21

  • Oct 21, 2013
  • Alexandra Forrester

New Executive Order Aims at More Efficient Regulation
On October 16th Gov. Malloy issued an Executive Order aimed at increasing regulatory transparency and efficiency. The order allows public comment on, and analysis of, state regulations four years or older. The agencies responsible for these regulations must then review these comments, conduct their own independent analysis, and submit a report on the results to the Governor’s office by February 14th of next year.

The order’s stated aim is to ease the “substantial burdens” that businesses face from state regulations.  In a Connecticut Business & Industry Association Survey 7 in 10 CT businesses said they believe that the state’s regulatory environment is more restrictive than other states.

The executive order is certainly a positive step, though where the rubber hits the road is in actually getting rid of counterproductive regulations.  For instance, the CPI’s recent report identifying some specific regulations where the costs exceed the benefits included environmental regulations that the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection itself has recommended repealing for several years.  But the legislature has yet to act on that recommendation.
It is also curious that the Governor is exempting from scrutiny any regulations passed under his watch.

What it means for you:  Anyone may comment on regulations passed more than four years ago until December 16th of this year.   You can email governor.regulations@ct.gov, or visit http://www.governor.ct.gov/regulations. 

Audit of UConn Health Center Reveals Overspending
An Audit of the UConn Health Center reveled fiscal inattentiveness, overspending, and a variety of other financial management problems with the state-funded health care and health research facility. Examples of mismanagement included overspending on legal fees, with billing rates as high as $820 per hour, and spending $73,000 on a sabbatical for an employee who never returned.

What it means for you: The dollar values at issue in the identified missteps are a small share of the Health Center’s budget.  But any mismanagement of the public fisc should be a matter of public concern.

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